TRAINING FILMS

US Model of 1917

1-01  Characteristics and Features

1-02  Field Strip

1-03  Loading and Unloading

1-04  Detailed Disassembly

1-05A  M1907 Sling

1-05B  Kerr Sling (M1917)

1-05C Follower Depressor

1-05D Cleaning Kit (Individual)


Mannlicher M95 Carbine

2-01  Characteristics and Features

2-02  Field Strip

2-03  Loading and Unloading

2-04  Detailed Disassembly

2-05A  Sling


Short, Magazine, Lee-Enfield (SMLE) (No. 1) Mk. III*

4-01  Characteristics and Features

4-02  Field Strip

4-03  Loading and Unloading

4-04  Detailed Disassembly

4-05A  Web Sling

4-05B Individual Cleaning Kit

4-05C Breach Cover

4-05D Leather Sling

Model 1891/30 Mosin-Nagant

6-01 Characteristics and Features

6-01A Feed Interrupter

6-02 Field Strip

6-03 Loading and Unloading

6-04 Detailed Disassembly

6-05A Web Sling

6-05B Cleaning Kit

M1 Rifle (Garand)

8-01 Characteristics and Features

8-02 Field Strip

8-03 Loading and Unloading

8-04 Detailed Disassembly

8-05A M1907 Sling

8-05B M1 Sling, Web

8-05C Cleaning kit, Individual w/ M3 Tool

8-05D Cleaning Kit, Individual w/ M3A1 Tool

8-05E Cleaning Kit, Individual w/ M10 Cleaning Rod

8-05F Winter Trigger

8-05G Muzzle Cover

8-05H M1923 Sling

Type 99 Arisaka

10-01  Characteristics and Features

10-02  Field Strip

10-03  Loading and Unloading

10-04  Detailed Disassembly

10-05A Leather Sling

10-05B Canvas Sling

10-05C Muzzle Cover


Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank (PIAT)

12-01  Characteristics and Features

12-02  Field Strip

12-03  Cocking and Uncocking

12-04 Loading, Aiming, and Firing

12-05A Sling

12-05B Practice Shot Adapter

M1 Carbine

13-01 Characteristics and Features

13-02 Field Strip

13-03 Loading and Unloading

13-04 Detailed Disassembly

13-05A Gun Sling and Oiler

13-05B Cleaning Rod and Case

13-05C Muzzle Cover

13-05D Recoil Check and Flash Hider

 

MILSURP OPERATOR

In this series we will be running historic military surplus firearms through modern shooting drills. This is a fun way to experience how these how these firearms may have been used in a combat environment and some of the quirks that go along with them. It also provides some metrics that can be used to compare these firearms. To gain more insight in to how these firearms might have been used, period correct ammunition pouches will be used as well.

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The US Model 1917 rifle. Adopted in 1917, it was the most numerous rifle used by the American Expeditionary Force during World War One. It is weighs 9 pounds 3 oz and is 46.3 inches long. The Model 1917 uses a cock on close, turn bolt action and is chambered for the .30-06 cartridge.  Loading will be done from a cartridge belt using 5 round stripper clips.

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The M95 was originally adopted by the Austria-Hungary empire in 1895 and served through World war one. Starting in 1930, most were shortened to carbine length and rechambered for a new cartridge, thus the name M95 30. They continued to see limited use in eastern Europe through the end of world war 2. The M95/30  weighs 6 pounds 13 oz and is 39.5 inches long. It uses a straight pull bolt action and is chambered for the 8x56mm rimmed cartridge. It requires the use of 5 round ammunition clips and loading will be done from a leather M95 ammo pouch.

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Adopted in 1915, the British SMLE Mk. III*, later designated the Rifle No. 1 Mk. III*, was a wartime simplification of the Mk. IIII for World War 1. It weighs 8 pounds 10 ounces and is 44 and a half inches long. The SMLE uses a cock on close, turn bolt action and is chambered for the .303 British cartridge. Loading will be done from a British pattern 37 ammunition pouch using 5 round chargers.

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The US Model 1903 was developed at the Springfield armory. It was adapted in 1903 and is commonly referred to as the 03 rifle. It would see service through world war one  and on in to the 1930s as the primary rifle for the united states. It weighs 8 pounds 7 ounces and is 43 and a quarter inches long. The 1903 uses a cock on open, turn bolt action and is chambered for the .30-06 cartridge. Loading will be done from a US M1923 style cartridge belt using 5 round stripper clips.

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The Japanese Type 99 rifle, commonly referred to as the Arisaka, was adopted by Japan in 1939. It was based on the Type 38 rifle but chambered with a larger caliber. The Type 99 would see service through the end of WWII but as the war progressed production of the rifle would be repeatedly simplified. It weighs 8 pounds 13 ounces and is 44 inches long. The Type 99 uses a cock on close, turn bolt action is chambered for the 7.7mm Japanese cartridge. Loading will be done from a WWII Japanese style ammunition pouch using 5 round stripper clips.

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The German Karabiner 98 kurz, or K98k , was adopted by Germany in 1936.  Derived from previous Mauser model 98 rifles, the K98k would see service through WWII as Germanys primary service rifle with captured and surplused rifles continuing to see service for decades  post war.  It weighs 9 pounds and is 43.7 inches long. The K98k uses a cock on open, turn bolt action and is chambered for the 8mm Mauser cartridge. Loading will be done from a German style ammunition pouch using 5 round stripper clips.

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Designed by John Garand, the M1 rifle was adopted by the US in 1936 and was the first standard issue semi automatic rifle issued by the US. It would see service through WWII and the Korean War before being replaced. It did continued to see service beyond this in other countries, as many were provided as foreign aid to US allies. It weighs 9 pounds 3 oz and is 43 and a half inches long. The M1 Rifle is a gas operated semiautomatic rifle and is chambered for the .30-06 cartridge. The rifle is loaded with M1 en bloc clips from a US M1923 style cartridge belt.

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Designed by Sergei Simonov in the Soviet Union during World War II, the SKS-45, or simply the SKS, was formally adopted by the Soviet Union in 1945. This abbreviation translates from Russian as Self-loading Carbine of (the) Simonov system. Intended to replace the outdated M91/30 Mosin Nagant rifles, the SKS quickly became outdated itself with the Soviet Union's adoption of the AK-47. While it was then relegated to rear echelon and ceremonial use, it continued to see service in Russia and numerous other countries for decades. It weighs 8.5 lbs and is 40 inches long. The SKS is a gas operated semiautomatic rifle, and is chambered for the 7.62x39mm cartridge. The carbine is loaded with 10 round stripper clips from a soviet ammo pouch.

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FN MODEL 1949

Designed by Dieudonné Saive at  Fabrique Nationale, development started prior to WWII but was interrupted when Germany invaded Belgium and Saive fled to England. With the war over, Saive returned to Belgium and finished the design. National adoption of the rifle was limited though due to the number of military surplus rifles available post WWII and the desire for more modern features such as detachable magazines. It weighs 9 pounds 8 oz and is 43 and a half inches long. The FN-49 is a gas operated semiautomatic rifle and this one, being an Egyptian contract rifle, is chambered for the 8mm Mauser cartridge. The rifle is loaded with 5 round stripper clips and this will be done from a British pattern 37 ammo pouch as was used by the Egyptian army at the time of the rifles adoption.